Announcements

2017 Dodds Prize Winner

 

It is my great pleasure to announce that Alyssa Hamer has been awarded the Dodds Prize for 2017 for her paper "Ethics of Archival Practice: New Considerations in the Digital Age." Alyssa graduated this past year with MAS and MLIS degrees from UBC, and her paper was submitted by Luciana Duranti.

Instituted in 2011, the Dodds Prize recognizes superior research and writing on an archival topic by a student enrolled in a Master's level archival studies program at a Canadian university. The award honours Gordon Dodds (1941-2010) who was the first President of the ACA, and Archivaria's longest-serving general editor. The submissions received for the 2016/17 academic year were reviewed by an adjudication committee consisting of Amy Marshall Furness (Archivaria Exhibition Review Editor / Art Gallery of Ontario), Braden Cannon (Provincial Archives of Alberta), Rebecka Sheffield (ACA Board designate / Simmons College), and Raymond Frogner (National Centre for Truth and Reconciliation).  I would like to thank the adjudication committee for their service.

The paper will be published in the Spring 2018 issue of Archivaria and the award will be formally presented at the ACA Conference in Edmonton next June.  The citation reads:

"This paper stands out for its critical, practical and constructive approach to the matter of archival ethics, revealing the inadequacy of current ethical codes, in a digital environment, to provide guidance for archivists in carrying out fundamental aspects of their work. The paper persuasively exposes the deficiencies of existing ethical standards with reference to real examples of challenging ethical situations that have faced archivists. In particular, the author's recognition of the ethical responsibilities related to working with minority communities and the ethical duty to preserve records that tell a plurality of perspectives should be applicable to both digital and paper-based records. The author's call for renewal and strengthening of professional ethics is particularly relevant to Canadian archivists now, as the ACA undertakes the revision of its own code of ethics."

Congratulations, Alyssa, on your excellent work!

Jeremy Heil
Managing Editor, Archivaria

 
Posted: 2017-10-13 More...
 

2017 Archivaria Awards

 

At the Association of Canadian Archivists 2017 Awards Luncheon in Ottawa, Jennifer Douglas, Archivaria General Editor announced the winners of the following prizes:

J.J. Ghaddar was awarded the W. Kaye Lamb Prize for her article, “The Spectre in the Archive: Truth, Reconciliation, and Indigenous Archival Memory,” which appears in Archivaria 82 (Fall 2016)

  • Named for Dr. William Kaye Lamb, Dominion Archivist of Canada from 1948-1969 and founding National Librarian of Canada, this prize is awarded annually to honour the author of the Archivaria article that, by its exceptional combination of research, reflection, and writing, most advances archival thinking in Canada. It is the senior award of the journal for the best article overall. The winner of the Lamb Prize is selected by General Editor, with the assistance of the members of the Archivaria Editorial Board.
  • J.J. Ghaddar’s article grapples with one of the most urgent issues currently facing the Canadian archival community: how to answer the calls to action of the Truth and Reconciliation commission without falling into complacency or self-congratulation. Ghaddar’s thoughtful analysis of two recent court cases involving the records gathered by the TRC exposes the politics of memory and oblivion in all their complexity. Passionate and persuasive, the article starts an important conversation about the many ways national settler archival repositories represent and uphold Canada’s colonialist endeavours. The concept of “haunting” provides a metaphor that allows us to see that placating the ghosts must not be the goal; to decolonize archives and begin to respond meaningfully to the demands of reconciliation, settler archivists need to accept a prolonged, uncomfortable co-existence with the “spectre” as we rethink the power structures of archives from the ground up.

 

Naomi Norquay was awarded the Hugh Taylor Prize for her article, “An Accidental Archive of the Old Durham Road: Reclaiming a Black Pioneer Settlement,” which appears in Archivaria 81 (Spring 2016)

  • The Hugh A. Taylor Prize was established in 2006 to honour the doyen of Canadian archival thinkers whose wide range of scholarly publications sparked the Canadian archival imagination. The prize is awarded annually to the author of the Archivaria article that presents new ideas or refreshing syntheses in the most imaginative way, especially by exploring the implications of concepts or trends from other disciplines for archival thinking and activity, and by extending the boundaries of archival theory in new directions. The winner of the Taylor prize is chosen by the General Editor and a professor of Archival Studies (selected by the General Editor), who decide the winner by consensus. This year the professor of archival studies who helped decide the winner of the award was Fiorella Foscarini from the University of Toronto. 
  • Written by an “accidental archivist,” this article is a fascinating, personal investigation of a disappeared community and its remaining textual, oral and material traces. Through her evocative prose, Norquay challenges the limitations of the official archive by turning to “the land as archival document,” both in a literal and a metaphorical sense. Norquay musters a range of scholarship including curriculum/education theory, archaeology, autobiographical studies, Black Canadian studies and Ann Cvetkovich’s idea of the “archive of feelings” and ties it neatly and specifically to elements of her case study. The reader is easily persuaded to look more closely at the recordness of seemingly unassuming material traces, arriving at an emotive (not merely rational) recognition of the limitations of traditional concepts of records and archives. This quietly beautiful article clearly demonstrates how enriching moving beyond the boundaries of a single discipline can be. 

 

Congratulations!

 
Posted: 2017-06-13 More...
 

2016 Dodds Prize Winner

 

It is my great pleasure to announce that Allison Mills has been awarded the Dodds Prize for 2016 for her paper "Learning to Listen: Archival Sound Recordings and Indigenous Cultural and Intellectual Property." Allison will be graduating this December with MAS and MLIS degrees from UBC, and her paper was submitted by Jessica Bushey. 

Instituted in 2011, the Dodds Prize recognizes superior research and writing on an archival topic by a student enrolled in a Master's level archival studies program at a Canadian university. The award honours Gordon Dodds (1941-2010) who was the first President of the ACA, and Archivaria's longest-serving general editor. The submissions received for the 2015/16 academic year were reviewed by an adjudication committee consisting of Amy Marshall Furness (Archivaria Exhibition Review Editor / Art Gallery of Ontario), Michael Gourlie (Provincial Archives of Alberta), Kathryn Harvey (ACA Board designate / University of Guelph), and Rodney Carter (Religious Hospitallers of St. Joseph).  I would like to thank the adjudication committee for their service.

The paper will be published in the Spring 2017 issue of Archivaria and the award will be formally presented at the ACA Conference in Ottawa next June.  The citation reads:

"This paper deftly explores the complexities at the intersection of Indigenous and Western notions of property rights while navigating issues surrounding the complex medium of sound recordings. Drawing on Canadian and international ethnographic research and legal scholarship regarding intellectual property rights from Indigenous and Western perspectives, Mills provides insight, perspective and a path forward for Canadian archival institutions with respect to their management of sound recordings involving Indigenous peoples.  This paper is particularly relevant and timely in the current context of Canada's truth and reconciliation process."

Congratulations, Allison, on your excellent work!

Jeremy Heil
Managing Editor, Archivaria

 
Posted: 2016-09-09 More...
 

2016 Archivaria Awards

 

At the Association of Canadian Archivists 2016 Awards Luncheon, Jennifer Douglas, Archivaria General Editor and Catherine Bailey, former General Editor announced the winners of these prizes:

Congratulations!

 
Posted: 2016-06-10 More...
 

2015 Dodds Prize Winner

 

As managing editor of Archivariait is my distinct pleasure to announce that Grant Hurley has been awarded the Dodds Prize for 2015 for his paper "Community Archives, Community Clouds: Enabling Digital Preservation for Small Archives." Grant will be graduating this November from the University of British Columbia, and his paper was submitted by Prof. Luciana Duranti.

Instituted in 2011, the Dodds Prize recognizes superior research and writing on an archival topic by a student enrolled in a Master's level archival studies program at a Canadian university. The award honours Gordon Dodds (1941-2010) who was the first President of the ACA, and Archivaria's longest-serving general editor.

Three submissions were received for the 2014/15 academic year, and reviewed by an adjudication committee consisting of: Heather MacNeil (Archivaria General Editor / University of Toronto), Joanna Aiton Kerr (Provincial Archives of New Brunswick), Ian Burnett (ACA Board designate / Yukon Archives), and Richard Dancy (Simon Fraser University). I would like to thank the adjudication committee for their service.

The paper will be published in the Spring 2016 issue of Archivaria and the award will be formally presented at the ACA Conference in Montreal next June. 

The citation reads: "In this well-written and researched article, Grant Hurley brings together the apparently distinct worlds of community archives and cloud computing and suggests ways and means by which cloud computing might enable creating communities to acquire and preserve born digital records. Thoughtful and perceptive, the paper nicely balances theoretical considerations with practical solutions."

Congratulations, Grant, for your excellent work!

Jeremy Heil
Managing Editor, Archivaria

 
Posted: 2015-09-29 More...
 

Archivaria Awards, 2015

 

At the Association of Canadian Archivists 2015 Awards Luncheon, Heather MacNeil, Archivaria General Editor announced the winners of these prizes:

 
Posted: 2015-06-15 More...
 

Editorial Team changes at Archivaria

 
The publication of Archivaria 78 marks the end of Suzanne’ Dubeau’s term as Managing Editor. Suzanne took on this role in 2011 and over the last 4 years and 8(!) issues of Archivaria she has carried out her responsibilities with exceptional skill, dedication and good humour. On behalf of the Editorial Board I would like to take the opportunity to thank Suzanne most sincerely for the excellent work she has done shepherding Archivaria 71-78 through the production process and I would like to thank her personally for all the sage advice and tremendous moral support she has given me since I became GE.
With Archivaria 79, Jeremy Heil officially begins his term as Managing Editor and Emily Sommers begins her term as Technical Coordinator. So, on behalf of the Editorial Board, I wish them both bon courage!
 
Posted: 2015-01-09 More...
 

2014 Dodds Prize Winner

 
As managing editor of Archivaria, I am very pleased to announce that Martin Skrypnyk has been award the
Gordon Dodds Prize for 2014 for his paper "The Pillow Book of Chris Marker."

Martin is a student at the University of Toronto and his paper was submitted by Prof. Heather MacNeil.

Instituted in 2011, the Dodds Prize recognizes superior research and writing on an archival topic by a student enrolled in a Master's level archival studies program at a Canadian university.

The award honours Gordon Dodds (1941-2010) who was the first President of the ACA, and Archivaria's longest-serving general editor. Eight submissions were received for the 2013/14 academic year, and reviewed by an adjudication committee consisting of:
Robert McIntosh (LAC) serving in place of the general editor,
Loryl Macdonald (University of Toronto),
Heather Home (Queen's University),
Jim Burant (LAC, retired)

The paper will be published in the Spring 2015 issue of Archivaria, and the award will be formally presented at the ACA conference in Regina next June.

Congratulations, Martin, for this excellent work!
And my thanks to the adjudication committee members for agreeing to serve.

Suzanne Dubeau
Managing Editor, Archivaria
 
Posted: 2014-09-26 More...
 

2014 Archivaria Awards

 
At the 2014 Award Luncheon, Heather MacNeil, General Editor, announced the following 2014 Archivaria Awards:

Creighton Barrett has been awarded the Hugh A. Taylor Prize for 2014 for his article "Respect Which Fonds? Personal Archives and Family Businesses in Nova Scotia” in Archivaria 76 (Fall 2013).

Jennifer Douglas has been awarded the W. Kaye Lamb Prize for 2014 for her article “What We Talk About When We Talk About Original Order in Writers’ Archives" in Archivaria 76 (Fall 2013).
 
Posted: 2014-07-03 More...
 

2013 Archivaria Award Recipients

 
Archivaria is pleased to announce that Geoffrey Yeo has been awarded the Hugh A. Taylor Prize for 2013 for his article "The conceptual Fonds and the Physical Collection" in Archivaria 73 (Spring 2012)
Archivaria is pleased to announce that Richard Dancy has been awarded the W. Kaye Lamb Prize for 2013 for his article "RAD Past, Present, and Future" in Archivaria 74 (Fall 2012)
Archivaria is pleased to announce that Jordan Bass has been awarded the Gordon Dodds Prize for 2012 for his article "A PIM Perspective: Leveraging Personal Information Management Research in the Archiving of Personal Digital Records" in Archivaria 75 (Spring 2013)
 
Posted: 2013-10-03 More...
 

2011 Archivaria Award Recipients

 
Congratulations to Raymond Frogner, winner of the W. Kaye Lamb award, and to Jennifer Meehan who won the Hugh Taylor prize.  
Posted: 2012-06-26 More...
 

Archivaria Awards for 2012

 
Archivaria is pleased to announce that Paul Conway and Ricardo Punzalan have been awarded the Hugh A. Taylor Prize for 2012 for their article “Fields of Vision: Toward a New Theory of Visual Literacy for Digitized Archival Photographs” Archivaria 71 (Spring 2011)
Archivaria is pleased to announce that Laura Carroll, Erika Farr, Peter Hornsby, and Ben Ranker have been awarded the W. Kaye Lamb Prize for 2012 for their article “A Comprehensive Approach to Born-Digital Archives” Archivaria 72 (Fall 2011)
 
Posted: 2012-06-26 More...
 

Archivaria Awards 2010

 
Jennifer Meehan has been awarded the Hugh A. Taylor Prize for 2011 for her article “Rethinking Original Order and Personal Records,” Archivaria 70 (Fall 2010).

Raymond Frogner has been awarded the W. Kaye Lamb Prize for 2011 for his article “Innocent Legal Fictions’: Archival Convention and the North Saanich Treaty of 1852” Archivaria 70 (Fall 2010)
 
Posted: 2011-07-05 More...
 

Archivaria Awards for 2009

 
The W. Kaye Lamb Prize and the Hugh A. Taylor Prize were awarded at the 2010 ACA Awards Lunch in Halifax. The winners for 2009 (issue 66-68), and the official citations follow.  
Posted: 2010-07-06 More...
 
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